Tag Archives: therapeutic

How to Lose Weight and Still Eat Everything You Like.

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Most people think you have to deny yourself your favorite foods and stick to a rigid diet to lose weight. On the contrary, the key to learning how to lose weight permanently is learning how to eat and enjoy everything you like in the right way, not making yourself go without. You even learn how to “splurge” on the weekend without gaining weight. This is not only possible, but is absolutely necessary if you want to lose weight permanently.

(The author is a psychotherapist who lost 140 lbs. when he developed his methods,  and he’s kept it off for over 30 years. Read about his method in his book at the right, or listen to his audiobook, free sample provided here.)

I was overweight and obese my entire life, well over 300 pounds at times and a miserable failure at diets and weight loss plans. I had given up more times than you can count. Fortunately, I kept looking for an answer and at the age of thirty-three, I finally learned how to lose weight for good and lost 140 pounds at a pretty fast clip. I’ve kept the weight off pretty easily for over thirty years now, and I eat everything I like. I don’t eat diet food and I don’t exercise like a health nut. I’m a Licensed Counselor now, I’ve helped thousands to succeed like I have, and I’ve written a popular and respected book about it, The Anderson Methodavailable in paperback, Kindle, and audiobook.

The truth is that there are no “bad” foods or “bad” calories. Managed healthfully, they are all good! I eat everything I like, and I’ve learned how to lose weight while going out to dinner, to parties, on vacation and how to have drinks and desserts and still lose weight pretty quickly. Here’s why and how it works:

If, over a month’s period of time, you’ve eaten fewer calories than you’ve burned in normal activities, regardless of what you’ve eaten and when you’ve eaten it, you’ll lose weight. You’ll lose weight even if you’ve eaten all your favorite foods, even if they are the things that the “diet experts” say you can’t eat.

If you’ve been listening to diet nonsense on TV, in the magazines and at lunch, you may be skeptical of this, but this is science. It’s easy to verify at any university or college. Your body doesn’t operate on a 24 hour schedule. A five foot four inch woman needs an average of approximately 1400 to 1800 calories per day, depending on the individual, and will not gain weight if she doesn’t exceed that. However, if she has habits where she averages that most of the time, and exceeds it only occasionally, which is very easy, she’ll get overweight and constantly gain weight! If you’re a normal American, this has probably been happening to you.

Instead of thinking of it as a 1800 calorie per day daily budget, think 12,600 calories per week. If you keep your weekdays at 1200, you’d have to eat more than 3800 calories per day on the weekends to gain weight! Keeping your weekdays austere gives you the ability to fit in anything without going “over budget”. A piece of cake is about 350 calories. A glass of wine is about 100. A normal serving of lasagna is about 500. If you think you can’t fit those things in on a day with a budget of 1800, we need to talk about that.

However, getting these new habits in place isn’t a matter of “will power” or “just making up your mind”. There is a scientific method in how to lose weight and keep it off, but it is not so much the science of nutrition as it is the science of psychology and behavioral medicine. Will power and self discipline were never within my grasp before I discovered the methods I teach my clients, the methods of Behavioral Medicine I call Therapeutic Psychogenics.

Reprogramming habits is the result of using these therapeutic techniques, methods of behavioral therapy. Once the habits are in place, we get a different result. We become and stay the weight we want to be. You’ve seen other people do it, those people who seem to eat just like you or worse and stay slim. You can do it too! Now, we eat only our favorite foods. We waste no calories on mediocre food. Our “diet” can include every kind of meat, potatoes, pasta, sauce, wine, drinks and even desserts that you can think of, as long as they are good enough for the calories they “cost”. We deny ourselves nothing.

There is a proven way to “reprogram” your habits so the calories come out right and it becomes automatic and habitual, even easy to maintain for many. Learning how to lose weight permanently is not impossible. It’s just work, and not hard work at that.

You don’t have to live a miserable life of diet food and torturous exercise to solve your weight problem. In fact, permanent weight loss is the result of learning a more pleasurable way of living that includes some of your most cherished foods and activities, a way that becomes habitual and normal for you. You can even become one of those infuriating people who seem to eat all the wrong things and “have no problem”. Read my book and you’ll truly find out how to lose weight.

What is Behavioral Medicine and Behavioral Healthcare?

A writer asks, “I’ve heard that you are very successful helping people to lose weight with ‘Behavioral Medicine’. I also know of a counseling center that calls itself ‘Behavioral Healthcare’. What do these terms mean?”

(The author is the psychotherapist who lost 140 lbs. when he discovered Therapeutic Psychogenics,  and he’s kept it off for over 25 years. He has written about it in his groundbreaking weight loss self-help book, The Anderson Method and has helped thousands to lose weight permanently with this approach. More about it at the end of the article.)

When I refer to my practice of behavioral medicine, I am referring mainly to my work in helping people establish the behavior that will treat or “cure” their disorders related to being overweight. Many diseases are caused or worsened by being overweight. Diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, disability, cancer, inflammatory disorders, depression, obesity itself – the list is endless of the life-threatening diseases that are caused by excess weight and conversely improved and even cured by weight loss. I’ve helped thousands to finally solve their “impossible” weight problem, successfully lose great amounts of weight and maintain a healthy weight. I do it with my brand of Behavioral Medicine I call Therapeutic Psychogenics.

We know that  an obesegenic lifestyle is the primary cause of the problem, eating more calories than we use and storing them as fat. Conversely, we know how to lose weight, regardless of the cause of the gain.  Eat fewer calories than we use and we lose weight. Eat in balance and we don’t regain. The thermodynamics is irrefutable. Simple, right? No.

While the thermodynamics of weight control are easily understood, the dynamics of human behavior are anything but.  While some people think that everyone should just be able to make up their mind to master their habits, desires and feelings, most of us know that it’s not that easy. The forces at work that shape our behavior, the drives, the neurochemistry, the conditioning and habit formation are not often within our conscious control, even when we understand them. Self control, especially when you are talking about compelling and addictive behaviors, is not just a matter of “wanting it Badly enough” or “will power”.

That’s where I and my brand of behavioral therapy comes in. Understanding more about ourselves and the psychological technique for self-mastery are things that can be learned and developed. We treat the whole person, body, mind and spirit. The components of my eclectic formula of therapy have many names in the profession – Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Cybernetic Self-Management  Technique, psychoeducation, nutrition education – together I call it Therapeutic Psychogenics. Many names but the goal is one: to create a permanent change in our automatic habitual behavior so that the way we habitually think, feel and act makes us lose the excess weight and keep it off. It’s kind of like “reprogramming”. It’s certainly not just “will power”.  Learning and developing the psychological “power tools” is what empowers us to change the behavior, not will alone. When we can change the behavior, the body will change.

However, Behavioral Medicine encompasses more than what I’ve just described.  Here’s the textbook definition: Behavioral Medicine is the interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral, psychosocial, and biomedical science, knowledge and techniques relevant to the understanding of health and illness, and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

The psyche and body are one. They are not separate. Our physical condition affects our spirit, mood and mental state. Drugs and our hormonal and neurochemical state affects or mood, thinking , feelings and behavior (appetite too). Our behavior influences our neurochemistry and hormones and creates physical conditions and many states of mind and spirit. Behavioral Medicine recognizes this and integrates these dimensions for purposes of understanding and treatment. Professionals from the medical and mental health fields attend to the whole person and fashion treatment protocols that call for intervention in all spheres. This is Behavioral Medicine.

Behavioral Health and Behavioral Healthcare are terms used in a more limited scope to address all the behavior we engage in that affects our health. It is used to describe complex psychological conditions like addictions and eating disorders, but also includes the everyday habits we have that affect our health. For instance, our use of seat belts in automobiles and hand washing procedure would be included as issues addressed in Behavioral health.

Behavioral Healthcare, seen as a part of Behavioral Medicine, most often describes mental health and psychiatric care specifically, including counseling for a variety of reasons.

I hope I have not been too clinical in trying to give an accurate and complete answer to this very good question. People hear these terms and rarely know what they mean. Most of us don’t want the jargon. I know my clients don’t care what it’s called. That it helps them to solve their weight problem is all they care about.

Behavioral Medicine saved my life when I discovered Therapeutic Psychogenics as a result of my work in addictions counseling and behavioral science. I lost 140 lbs using this method, after 25 years of failure with diets and exercise schemes and I’ve kept it off for 25 years. I’ve been helping others since, teaching other therapists too, and I’ve also got a book about it. If you’ve had a terrible time trying to lose weight, Behavioral Medicine has the best solution. Go to www.TheAndersonMethod.com to get more information about my work, my growing network of therapists, and my book describing the method.