All bodies matter: How body-shaming makes America less healthy

 

BodyShaming_BlogFeature-1024x585The cure to the obesity epidemic, most doctors say, is a nutritious diet and exercise. But many health-care workers say that solution ignores the role of emotional and mental well-being play in maintaining a healthy weight.

By Chandra Johnson
May 26, 2016

William Anderson was about 7 when he first experienced fat shaming.

It was 1956, and he was in the second grade in Springfield, Massachusetts. It was Valentine’s Day, he recalls, and his teacher brought in a cake for everyone in class — except him.

“I’d really been looking forward to it and of course, I couldn’t have any,” Anderson said.

Anderson doesn’t remember how much he weighed then, but it was enough for his pediatrician to put him on a special diet. All that did was give him a lousy relationship with food.

“That was the beginning of the problem for me because food became a lot more important to me,” said Anderson, now 66. “From then on, my whole sense of self was dominated by being overweight and being an outcast because of it.”

Click here to read the whole story published in The Deseret News.

 

 

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