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Welcome, Dr. Leonard Carroll, Our Newest Clinician Offering The Anderson Method.

Asked to give a brief bio of himself for this article announcing his appointment as an Anderson Method Therapist, Dr. Carroll responded: “I am a Board Certified general Surgeon for many years in Tennessee and now in south Florida for 10 years. I am also a Board Certified Addictionologist. I have lost and kept off almost 100 pounds using the only program that has ever helped me -The Anderson Method.”

I had the extreme pleasure to be Dr. Carroll’s therapist, teaching him my method, which he wanted to share with his patients after learning  it and applying it successfully for himself. He is a wonderful man, a great client, and no doubt a great healer.

Dr. Carroll is located in Clewiston, Florida, and he can be contacted though the listing below.

R Leonard Carroll M.D.
540 West Sagamore Avenue
Clewiston, Florida 33440
(863) 885-2735
rlcarroll@hendryregional.org

All bodies matter: How body-shaming makes America less healthy

 

BodyShaming_BlogFeature-1024x585The cure to the obesity epidemic, most doctors say, is a nutritious diet and exercise. But many health-care workers say that solution ignores the role of emotional and mental well-being play in maintaining a healthy weight.

By Chandra Johnson
May 26, 2016

William Anderson was about 7 when he first experienced fat shaming.

It was 1956, and he was in the second grade in Springfield, Massachusetts. It was Valentine’s Day, he recalls, and his teacher brought in a cake for everyone in class — except him.

“I’d really been looking forward to it and of course, I couldn’t have any,” Anderson said.

Anderson doesn’t remember how much he weighed then, but it was enough for his pediatrician to put him on a special diet. All that did was give him a lousy relationship with food.

“That was the beginning of the problem for me because food became a lot more important to me,” said Anderson, now 66. “From then on, my whole sense of self was dominated by being overweight and being an outcast because of it.”

Click here to read the whole story published in The Deseret News.

 

 

Quitters CAN Be Winners

(First published in The Huffington Post)

I’m sure you’ve heard these famous sayings:

“Never, never, never give up.” ― Winston Churchill

“Winners never quit and quitters never win.” – Vince Lombardi

Whenever I heard those words as a young person, it always made me sick. They were famous sayings by famous men, repeated over and over, as if they should inspire people. But it never helped me to hear those things when I was on the verge of quitting. It just made me feel bad about myself. It made me think I must be a loser. The winners were putting me down. I was a quitter and I wanted very much to be a winner, but when the going got tough, I just could not keep going. I was weak. And it would make me sick when I heard those things, or even thought them.

They were wrong.

I’ve discovered that all winners have failed and given up, quit, many times. What turns losers into winners is not that they never quit, but that they got up and dusted themselves off after recovering, and went at it again. They persisted.

All winners have failed and quit many times. All winners have been quitters.

Think of all of us as babies, learning to crawl and walk. We try to stand, and we fall. Over and over again. There is no shame. There is just the excitement that first time, when we finally stay up and tower over everything. Then we fall. Hee, hee.

With enough practice and repetitions, we learn to walk. No one learns to walk without falling many times, thousands, maybe tens of thousands of times. This is how we all learned to win, how you learned to win. This is you. A winner.

But then, somewhere along the line, we got the idea that failing was bad. At home or at school, we started noticing that others would laugh or put us down if we were not good at something. Or we would mistakenly believe that we should be able to do something well instantly, and we’d be hurt if we did not. We thought there was something wrong with us. We’d be hurt and ashamed. We learned that the way to not get hurt was to quit, and not try again.

As babies, there was no shame in falling. It was fun, just part of the process. When we got tired, we quit, and rested. All was good. And then we tried again. Eventually, we walked and then we ran. Nothing could stop us. But then we learned to be ashamed, to be disappointed, expecting instant success and not getting it. We learned to stop trying when we failed.

“Anything worth doing is worth doing badly.” ― G.K. Chesterton

Anything worth doing is worth doing badly. The first time I heard this, my brain revolted. It was the opposite of what I had aways heard, that anything worth doing was worth doing well. It was a famous coach who flipped this for me and it took a while to sink in and for me realize it was true.

He was talking about his kids wanting to be musicians and discovering that when they picked up the instrument and tried to make music, it was absolutely awful. It hurt your ears. And the kids, making fun of each other, saying they stunk, wanted to quit. They thought that they should be successful right away.

But we know that to do anything well, especially something difficult, you have to start out by doing it badly, failing, and when you get tired, you throw it down and quit, because it is so painful. But then, after a while, if you pick it up again, you learn more and get a little better. And you keep doing this until you succeed, as long as you persist in the work.

“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again.” – William Edward Hickson

This is the saying that inspired me, that helped. It said that it was normal to fail, that it is OK. Of course, it feels awful to fail. You are deprived of the success you crave, but as long as you’re not dead, you’ll get another shot at it. So, while you are OK if you failed and survived, it is not OK to just sit there, without being OK the way you really need to be.

“As long as you survive, anything is possible” – William Anderson, LMHC

I failed at weight loss for 25 years, thousands of times, and I’d hate to count how many times I quit in tears, swearing I’d never diet again. But after a while, learning more with each failure, I learned “dieting” is not the way to succeed. In my early thirties I lost 140 pounds and I have kept it off for 30 years. It’s a miracle my bad habits didn’t kill me, but I was able to change things before they did.

I had similar experiences with college and in business too, banging my head against the wall, trying to make things work with methods that didn’t work for me, until I would fail and quit, swearing that was the end of trying. But it didn’t kill me, and eventually, after enough of a retreat, I’d try another way, having learned from my last failure. I’m slower than most, but I got my college degree at 40, a graduate degree at 50, and success in business too, after some very painful failures. Fortunately, the repeated defeats never brought me to the point of no return, and my work eventually bore fruit. As long as you are alive and breathing, dreams can come true.

“Part of being successful is knowing when to quit.” — William Anderson, LMHC

Working hard at a method that will not produce the desired result is futile. The old idiom “just keep going and work hard” will not get you where you want to go if you are on the wrong road, going the wrong way. This was the case many times I dieted and many times I signed up for classes or worked a business idea. I didn’t know it when I started out, but I was working a plan that would never work. The only result in persisting in a faulty plan is failure. In that case, quitting the wrong plan is just as important as persisting in the right plan.

“Tomorrow is a new day.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

So many times I heard this from my mother when I was young. I would be seeking solace because of some failure, or throwing a tantrum quitting and swearing never to try again at some skill or project. She would encourage me to quit for the day and forget about it. “That’s enough for today. Go to sleep. Tomorrow is a new day.”

Being persistent is not the same thing as not quitting. Persisting is getting up and trying again. To be successful, we need to know when to quit, especially if we’ve been doing something that is destined to fail. We regroup, and then get up and try again after we’ve recovered from our fall. That’s how you learned to walk. That’s how you’ll succeed in other endeavors, as long as you survive. Work the plan, rest safely when you tire, make corrections, and try again. This is how all winners have won, through failing, quitting what doesn’t work, learning, and trying again. That’s persistence.

You are still the creation and spirit you were as the infant that learned to walk. What is it that you would like to accomplish? Weight loss? Better relationships? More success in work and finances? Happiness? There is a way to win, even if you’ve failed in the past, even if you quit and had given up. You may have to rest and remember tomorrow is a new day. You may have to quit a way that does not work. You may have to change some things you haven’t wanted to change.

Believe me, you are a winner. You may have failed and quit in your past, but you have survived. You have succeeded in so many things that you can read or hear what I’ve written here. You have persisted and won. Your true self is a winner. You have what it takes to win. You just need to do what it takes to uncover it.

So, what is it you’d like to win now?

Gastric Surgery Now Prescribed For Diabetes – Weight Loss a Side Benefit

Bariatric surgery

Gastric surgery is now being prescribed to treat diabetes, with weight loss being a side benefit. International diabetes organizations are calling for weight-loss surgery to become a more routine treatment option for diabetes, even for some patients who are only mildly obese.

Of course, don’t forget that you still need to change your behavior to keep from being overweight. That’s why gastric surgeons refer their patients to The Anderson Method. 

This is something for people with diabetes to study.

Here’s a link to the whole story:

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/diabetes/obesity-surgery-good-way-treat-diabetes-groups-agree-n579531

One antidepressant shown to control weight during 2-year study

(While I have always emphasized that real success in weight loss is achieved only by learning how to manage behavior like my program teaches, I have always advocated the legitimate use of medications to correct neurotransmitter disregulation that can heighten appetite, making self-control more difficult than it has to be. Here is an interesting report, first published in Science Daily.)


Group Health researchers have found that bupropion (marketed as Wellbutrin) is the only antidepressant that tends to be linked to long-term modest weight loss.

Previously, Group Health researchers showed a two-way street between depression and body weight: People with depression are more likely to be overweight, and vice versa. These researchers also found that most antidepressant medications have been linked to weight gain.

Prior research on antidepressants and weight change was limited to one year or shorter. But many people take antidepressants–the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States–for longer than a year. So for up to two years the new study followed more than 5,000 Group Health patients who started taking an antidepressant. The Journal of Clinical Medicine published it: “Long-Term Weight Change after Initiating Second-Generation Antidepressants.”

“Our study suggests that bupropion is the best initial choice of antidepressant for the vast majority of Americans who have depression and are overweight or obese,” said study leader David Arterburn, MD, MPH. He’s a senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute (GHRI), a Group Health physician, and an affiliate associate professor in the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine’s Department of Medicine. But in some cases, an overweight or obese patient has reasons why bupropion is not for them–like a history of seizure disorder–and it would be better for them to choose a different treatment option.

Study findings

“We found that bupropion is the only antidepressant that tends to be linked to weight loss over two years,” Dr. Arterburn said. “All other antidepressants are linked to varying degrees of weight gain.”

After two years, nonsmokers lost an average of 2.4 pounds on bupropion–compared with gaining an average of 4.6 pounds on fluoxetine (Prozac). So those who took bupropion ended up weighing 7 pounds less than did those on fluoxetine.

Unsurprisingly, that difference wasn’t seen in people who smoked tobacco. Bupropion is often used to help patients stop smoking. So smokers who take bupropion are likely to be trying to quit–and coping with the weight gain that often accompanies attempts to quit smoking.

Who should try which antidepressant?

“A large body of evidence indicates no difference in how effectively the newer antidepressants improve people’s moods,” said Dr. Arterburn’s coauthor Gregory Simon, MD, MPH, a Group Health psychiatrist, GHRI senior investigator, and research professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the UW School of Medicine. “So it makes sense for doctors and patients to choose antidepressants on the basis of their side effects, costs, and patients’ preferences–and, now, on whether patients are overweight or obese.”

Bupropion should be considered the first-line drug of choice for people who are overweight or obese, Dr. Simon said. But patients should consult their doctor about which medication is right for them, before making any changes, including starting, switching, or stopping medication.

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Group Health Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.